Live Review: Sigrid @ Metronome

After releasing her second album How to Let Go last Friday, Sigrid embarked on an intimate record store tour around the UK. Emily Campbell was lucky enough to catch her playing some tracks from the new album at Nottingham’s Metronome.


The Metronome only holds 400 at capacity, so I was intrigued to see how a relatively big artist like Sigrid, who is used to playing at much larger venues, would adapt to a smaller and, as she put it, more ‘cosy’ setting. It’s safe to say she had the audience engaged from the start. She seemed to be at home on the stage and treated the audience like friends rather than fans. Before performing each song, she spoke about the inspirations behind the album and reminisced over stories from previous performances. Her chatty nature created an interactive environment between her, the fans and her guitarists Liva and Sondre. On multiple occasions she had the audience chuckling away, especially when it took her three times to start A Driver Saved My Night because she couldn’t stop laughing.


Due to the acoustic nature of the tour, the songs were stripped back instrumentally with only a bass and acoustic guitar accompanying her. However, this was a bonus for the audience because we had the chance to hear new, acoustic arrangements. These versions allowed her incredible vocal range to take centre stage. This was particularly seen in the opening song Burning Bridges, in which her voice was full of confidence and energy. Within the song she even decided to add some complex, rising riffs which made it in my opinion better than the original single.


For someone so young, she intuitively explores heartbreak in a mature way

For someone so young, she intuitively explores heartbreak in a mature way within songs like Risk of Getting Hurt and Thank Me Later. Despite these songs being relatively sad in their content, she performed them in an optimistic style and the lyrics flowed seamlessly from one line to the next. It Gets Dark was the song Sigrid was most looking forward to performing live and her enthusiasm shone through, particularly when she effortlessly hit the high note at the end, to which she received a huge round of applause from the audience.



A clear highlight for many audience members was Bad Life, her latest collaboration with Bring Me The Horizon. For this song, the instrumentalists left the stage and for the first time she accompanied herself on piano. This provided an even more stripped-back intimate atmosphere than the rest of the set. Even though the rock influence from Bring Me The Horizon was missing in the second half, it allowed the song to become more vulnerable. It also enabled the lyrics to become more prominent than in the original version. While this was an impressive performance of the song, it would be amazing to see them perform this iconic single live together at some point in the future.


Within the crowd there was a real sense of community and some dedicated audience members had clearly attended the previous London show so were familiar with the set. Towards the end of the performance, however, it became clear who Sigrid’s ultimate fan was. To the rest of the audience’s amusement, he turned around to the crowd and proudly showed everyone his Sigrid tattoo.


This certainly has to be one of the most laidback gigs I’ve been to, and by the end of her short 40-minute set Sigrid had the crowd buzzing with admiration for her musical talent

Sigrid finished the gig by singing Grow, a melancholy song about growing up in the music industry as a young musician but still feeling deeply connected to her roots. Liva in this song provided some impressive, smooth harmonies which complemented Sigrid’s voice and elevated the whole performance. This certainly has to be one of the most laidback gigs I’ve been to, and by the end of her short 40-minute set Sigrid had the crowd buzzing with admiration for her musical talent.


Emily Campbell

 

Edited by: Gemma Cockrell


Featured image courtesy of Emily Campbell.